here it was we lit the flame
I'm Megan


{I'm uncertain who made the gif-- let me know so I can give you credit!}



(Source: love-amabile, via en-prosa)


posted 1 day ago with 675 notes (originally from love-amabile)
#dead and gone #my sun and stars #fernando torres


"Failure is necessary."

Part 2 

At one point during the interview, Fernando Torres finally feels like answering questions thoroughly. A half-smirk appears, the kind of smirk he uses to distance himself from anyone with a tape recorder. Detached, but sincere. Too sincere perhaps, at a point where it’s clear there’s many, many things he feels like saying, things that go far beyond football, which it would appear isn’t as important to him as it once was. Or is it? 

You’ve lived in London for three and a half years, is it a greater city than Liverpool? 
In what way? 

I don’t know, to live. You used to love Liverpool. 
It’s different. I had a very good time in Liverpool. But I had no kids, I didn’t speak the language that well. You can’t even begin to compare them. My lifestyle in London is extremely good. 

How are the kids dealing with it all? Are they bilingual by now? 
Kids are so impressive. They’re able to adapt to everything. The only things they need to thrive is love and support, to be happy and with their families. They make friends in a matter of minutes. They speak both english and spanish. 

What should we learn in Spain from the english? 
It’s not a matter of learning anything. The cultures are very different. You can’t just attempt to copy certain cultural aspects from one place to another. Spain’s football culture is very different from England’s. Here, the press doesn’t bother too much to talk about possible line ups during week days. Football is the match itself. Here, it’s much easier to distance yourself from whatever’s happening outside and not to have football-related problems affect your personal life. To me that’s incredibly positive, even if I’m sure that some people don’t like it as much. 

I get the impression that you don’t miss Spanish football that much. 
No, no, of course I don’t. 

What do you believe in? 
When it comes to football? 

When it comes to life. 
I believe in hard work, in team work and team effort, in sacrifice, in well-grounded and well-founded ambition, in respect, in the values I’ve tried to stick by since I was 10 years old. 

It’s a funny thing. Your narrative hasn’t changed since you were 20 years old, and you’re 30 now. 
There have been times in my career where the values I’ve tried to stick by haven’t led me to success, but when they have it’s when I’ve felt it’s really been worth it. It’s what I was taught and it’s the only way I know how to go on about things. Through work, sacrifice, selflessness, without ever intending to be better than anyone else. That’s what’s got me here, and that’s what I hope to teach my children in the near future. 

I also get the impression that you’re just over the whole thing. 
What does that even mean? 

You look hopeless. 
That’s what you think of me, don’t you? 

Yes. 
No. 

You’re not hopeless? 
In what way? 

In football. I get the impression that you’ve been through many bad moments and you’re at a point where you’re just simply over it. But that’s my opinion. 
Yes, I see where you’re coming from. But it doesn’t necessarily work that way. I’ve been through many good moments and many bad moments. I’ve seen football’s most beautiful side and its most unpleasant side. I’ve won and I’ve lost. But I’ve never been without hope. You cannot play football without hope, it’s not possible. You cannot look at it as a mere job, you can’t let it become that. If you do, that’s as far as you’ll go. There’s nothing left to do after that. Football is about passion, about hope. It’s about having played over 500 matches and still feel absolutely overwhelmed every time you step on a pitch and see the stands packed, or the child who’s there for the first time in his life, or the man who’s been a club member for over 40 years and who spends his weekdays counting the hours because the only thing he longs for is for the weekend to arrive so he can go see his team play. If you’re capable of thinking about each and every one of them, feel their emotions and in turn, feel with them, you can’t ever be without hope. I’m not over anything. Not yet. 

Is football about disillusion?
 It depends on what you consider football to be. Some might think it’s a easy way to make money, some might look at it as a mere job, some might think of it as their biggest passion. Disillusion and despair are necessary, means to an end, both in football and in life. 

Is football more about the good or the bad stuff? 
Football is a 90 minute event. And the 60-90 minutes of weekly training. And during that time, rarely anything truly unpleasant happens. It’s what lies beyond what I don’t like. Not one bit. 

What lies beyond cannot even be called football. 
 Of course it can’t. Football is having a ball at your feet. Everything else is something else, but it’s not football. Its surroundings, where many interests lie, obviously, are everything <em>but</em> football. 

We’re done now. 
 We are? Well that was easy. 

He’s probably right (x).
"Failure is necessary."
Part 2
At one point during the interview, Fernando Torres finally feels like answering questions thoroughly. A half-smirk appears, the kind of smirk he uses to distance himself from anyone with a tape recorder. Detached, but sincere. Too sincere perhaps, at a point where it’s clear there’s many, many things he feels like saying, things that go far beyond football, which it would appear isn’t as important to him as it once was. Or is it?
You’ve lived in London for three and a half years, is it a greater city than Liverpool?
In what way?
I don’t know, to live. You used to love Liverpool.
It’s different. I had a very good time in Liverpool. But I had no kids, I didn’t speak the language that well. You can’t even begin to compare them. My lifestyle in London is extremely good.
How are the kids dealing with it all? Are they bilingual by now?
Kids are so impressive. They’re able to adapt to everything. The only things they need to thrive is love and support, to be happy and with their families. They make friends in a matter of minutes. They speak both english and spanish.
What should we learn in Spain from the english?
It’s not a matter of learning anything. The cultures are very different. You can’t just attempt to copy certain cultural aspects from one place to another. Spain’s football culture is very different from England’s. Here, the press doesn’t bother too much to talk about possible line ups during week days. Football is the match itself. Here, it’s much easier to distance yourself from whatever’s happening outside and not to have football-related problems affect your personal life. To me that’s incredibly positive, even if I’m sure that some people don’t like it as much.
I get the impression that you don’t miss Spanish football that much.
No, no, of course I don’t.
What do you believe in?
When it comes to football?
When it comes to life.
I believe in hard work, in team work and team effort, in sacrifice, in well-grounded and well-founded ambition, in respect, in the values I’ve tried to stick by since I was 10 years old.
It’s a funny thing. Your narrative hasn’t changed since you were 20 years old, and you’re 30 now.
There have been times in my career where the values I’ve tried to stick by haven’t led me to success, but when they have it’s when I’ve felt it’s really been worth it. It’s what I was taught and it’s the only way I know how to go on about things. Through work, sacrifice, selflessness, without ever intending to be better than anyone else. That’s what’s got me here, and that’s what I hope to teach my children in the near future.
I also get the impression that you’re just over the whole thing.
What does that even mean?
You look hopeless.
That’s what you think of me, don’t you?
Yes.
No.
You’re not hopeless?
In what way?
In football. I get the impression that you’ve been through many bad moments and you’re at a point where you’re just simply over it. But that’s my opinion.
Yes, I see where you’re coming from. But it doesn’t necessarily work that way. I’ve been through many good moments and many bad moments. I’ve seen football’s most beautiful side and its most unpleasant side. I’ve won and I’ve lost. But I’ve never been without hope. You cannot play football without hope, it’s not possible. You cannot look at it as a mere job, you can’t let it become that. If you do, that’s as far as you’ll go. There’s nothing left to do after that. Football is about passion, about hope. It’s about having played over 500 matches and still feel absolutely overwhelmed every time you step on a pitch and see the stands packed, or the child who’s there for the first time in his life, or the man who’s been a club member for over 40 years and who spends his weekdays counting the hours because the only thing he longs for is for the weekend to arrive so he can go see his team play. If you’re capable of thinking about each and every one of them, feel their emotions and in turn, feel with them, you can’t ever be without hope. I’m not over anything. Not yet.
Is football about disillusion?
It depends on what you consider football to be. Some might think it’s a easy way to make money, some might look at it as a mere job, some might think of it as their biggest passion. Disillusion and despair are necessary, means to an end, both in football and in life.
Is football more about the good or the bad stuff?
Football is a 90 minute event. And the 60-90 minutes of weekly training. And during that time, rarely anything truly unpleasant happens. It’s what lies beyond what I don’t like. Not one bit.
What lies beyond cannot even be called football.
Of course it can’t. Football is having a ball at your feet. Everything else is something else, but it’s not football. Its surroundings, where many interests lie, obviously, are everything <em>but</em> football.
We’re done now.
We are? Well that was easy.
He’s probably right (x).

(Source: en-prosa, via lord-fernando)


posted 2 days ago with 195 notes (originally from en-prosa)
#my sun and stars #fernando torres

ihavealotoffeelings:

Don’t be upset, Aggie! You’re the hand of the King. :)

Rewatched Enemies of Rome yesterday and I’m still completely obsessed with this moment. Agron is instantly in a sulk because he doesn’t get to go on the cool assassination mission with Spartacus, and Spartacus is like “dude, I’m trusting you with the entire fucking army”.

And it says so much about Agron’s character and their relationship in WOTD. I think it’s fairly obvious that for Agron, the ultimate expression of trust and friendship in someone is wanting them to fight at your side. So he always wants to be the one at Spartacus’ side, because that means Spartacus trusts him the most, right? But what Spartacus is doing here—and what he does when he leaves Agron keeping the peace in Sinuessa, and what he does at the end, shows a huge amount of trust in Agron. 

And Agron repeatedly fails to recognize that. He sees Spartacus wanting other people who are not Agron at his side, and instantly perceives it as a slight. Even at the end, he sees himself as being put in charge of the group going to the mountains because Spartacus thinks he’s useless in battle now, when being trusted with that duty, making sure that some of them get out alive and this wasn’t all for nothing, is one of the most un-useless things anyone can do.

I just have a lot of feelings about Agron not knowing his full potential as a leader, and Spartacus trying to get him to see it. ;_________;

(Source: rafah-x, via steorie)


posted 2 days ago with 417 notes (originally from rafah-x)
#hahaha #stabbing myself in the eye #feels #agron #spartacus

(Source: gameofgifs, via seguining)



(Source: theonqreyjoy, via holgerbadstubers)


posted 2 days ago with 44,605 notes (originally from theonqreyjoy)
#a song of ice and fire

Fernando Torres arrives at the Vicente Calderon. (x)

(Source: mourinhospresser, via torresromance)




Detail of Rochefort’s Escape, by Édouard Manet.

Detail of Rochefort’s Escape, by Édouard Manet.

(Source: marieantoinete, via marthajefferson)


posted 2 days ago with 22,135 notes (originally from marieantoinete)

Fernando soothes a child who was crying because he thought he wouldn’t meet him (x). 

(Source: en-prosa, via gfsports)



(Source: mithrandy, via gameofthronesdaily)


posted 3 days ago with 9,138 notes (originally from mithrandy)
#oberyn martell #game of thrones

greaterland:

Scottish Highlands

(via spectralenko)


posted 3 days ago with 5,378 notes (originally from greaterland)